Lab whiteboarding Defend-the-Model Protocol poster

This is a work in progress, and I encourage feedback. The current version of the poster source code will be at GitHub. Here’s the current PDF (lab-whiteboarding-defend-the-model-beamer-poster-18×24-2013-14-2.pdf) if you don’t have LaTeX.

The idea for the poster comes from Frank Noschese, but blame me for the implementation. As a poster it’s not great yet. The example is just there with no prompts for how to use it. A graph would be helpful. These I’ll add later if the basic idea is sound. It could also do with a different example.

I’ll post images of the various incarnations below.

1st attempt

1st attempt

Update 2013-06-16: Based on feedback from Josh Gates, I’ve changed the last conceptual tool.

2nd attempt

2nd attempt

Posters

Thanks to Fedex Office’s half price posters with mounting and laminating, I was able to turn the seven posters I’ve been creating over the past year into real products, 18 inch by 24 inch prints.  There will be a few errors—I’ve already found one grammatical error—but hopefully they’ll be more useful than not as reminders for students even if their size isn’t large enough for every student to read everything.

Image

Update: You can now find source code for this and other posters in my GitHub repository.

Rules of Ten: rules of thumb for data collection and processing

Continuing my run making small posters of semi-useful information for physics classes (see Graph Analysis and Mathematical Models), I present the 3rd installment, adapted from Andy Smith’s list that he uses in his class.

rule-of-10-beamer-poster-18×24.pdf

Update: You can now find source code for this and other posters in my GitHub repository.

\documentclass[final]{beamer} % beamer 3.10: do NOT use option hyperref={pdfpagelabels=false} !
%\documentclass[final,hyperref={pdfpagelabels=false}]{beamer} % beamer 3.07: get rid of beamer warnings
\mode<presentation> {  %% check http://www-i6.informatik.rwth-aachen.de/~dreuw/latexbeamerposter.php for examples
\usetheme{default}    %% you should define your own theme e.g. for big headlines using your own logos
\beamertemplatenavigationsymbolsempty
\definecolor{royalblue}{rgb}{0,0.13725490196078433,0.4}
\definecolor{royalblueweb}{rgb}{0.25490196078431371,0.41176470588235292,0.88235294117647056}
\definecolor{burntorange}{rgb}{0.8,0.3333333333333333,0}
\definecolor{silver}{rgb}{0.75294117647058822,0.75294117647058822,0.75294117647058822}
\setbeamercolor{frametitle}{fg=blue!80!black}
\setbeamertemplate{frametitle} {
\begin{center}
\vspace{-2.5cm}\textbf{\insertframetitle} \par
\normalsize\textbf{\insertframesubtitle}
\end{center}
}
\setbeamertemplate{enumerate items}[circle]
\setbeamercolor{structure}{fg=burntorange}
\setbeamercolor{enumerate item projected}{fg=white}
\setbeamerfont{item projected}{size=\normalsize}
\setbeamertemplate{enumerate item}
{
\usebeamerfont*{item projected}%
\usebeamercolor[bg]{item projected}%
\begin{pgfpicture}{-1ex}{0ex}{1ex}{2ex}
\pgfpathcircle{\pgfpoint{0pt}{.75ex}}{1.2ex}
\pgfusepath{fill}
\pgftext[base]{\color{fg}\insertenumlabel}
\end{pgfpicture}%
}

}
\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage[latin1]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath,amsthm, amssymb, latexsym}
\usepackage{bbding}
%\usepackage{times}
%\usefonttheme{professionalfonts}  % times is obsolete
\usefonttheme[onlymath]{serif}
\boldmath
%\usepackage[orientation=portrait,size=a0,scale=1.4,debug]{beamerposter}                       % e.g. for DIN-A0 poster
%\usepackage[orientation=portrait,size=a1,scale=1.4,grid,debug]{beamerposter}                  % e.g. for DIN-A1 poster, with optional grid and debug output
\usepackage[size=custom,width=45.72,height=60.96,scale=1.8,debug]{beamerposter}                     % e.g. for custom size poster (18in x 24in w/ printable 17in x 23in)
%\usepackage[orientation=portrait,size=a0,scale=1.0,printer=rwth-glossy-uv.df]{beamerposter}   % e.g. for DIN-A0 poster with rwth-glossy-uv printer check
% ...
%
\geometry{margin=1in}
\def\imagetop#1{\vtop{\vspace{-1.5cm}\null\hbox{#1}\vspace{-1.5cm}}}
\usepackage{tikz}

\newcommand{\header}[1]{\textcolor{royalblueweb}{\textbf{#1}}}
\newcommand{\spacing}{\vspace{1.0em}}
\newcommand{\parasep}{\vspace{-0.0\baselineskip}\textcolor{silver}{\large\hfill\FiveStar\hfill\FiveStar\hfill\FiveStar\hfill}\vspace{-0.0\baselineskip}}

% From Andrew Smith on MODELING PHYSICS LISTSERVE
\title[Rules of Ten]{Rules of Ten: rules of thumb for data collection and processing}
\author[Vancil]{Brian Vancil}
\institute[Sumner]{Sumner Academy of Arts & Sciences}
\date{2012-04-07}

\begin{document}
\begin{frame}{Rules of Ten}
\framesubtitle{rules of thumb for data collection and processing}
\vspace{-1.5em}\parasep
\begin{enumerate}

\item \header{Collect at least 10 data points.}  A data point is one pairing of independent and dependent variable measurements.  Without enough data points, we cannot reliably find trends in the data. \spacing

\item \header{The largest independent variable measurement should be at least 10 times the smallest independent variable measurement.}  Nature sometimes surprises us at larger or smaller scales than we think to look. \spacing

\item \header{We like the uncertainty in our measurements to be less than 10\% of the range of the measurements.}  There is no point in trying to understand our results mathematically if the variation we see is around the same size as the uncertainty in the measurements. \spacing

\item \header{We like the root mean square error (RMSE) for a fit to be less than 10\% of the range of dependent variable measurements.}  A large RMSE means that our mathematical model does not fit the data very well. \spacing

\item \header{We will consider the vertical intercept negligible if it is less than 5\% of the range of the dependent variable measurements.}  A vertical intercept is likely to be meaningful if it has a decent magnitude compared with our dependent variable measurements.

\end{enumerate}
\spacing\parasep
%\vfill
\begin{center}\footnotesize
Adapted from a list by Andrew~Smith, Air~Academy~High~School, Colorado~Springs,~CO
\end{center}
\end{frame}
\end{document}

Basic Classes of Mathematical Models

Following David Hestenes on page 6 of Modeling Instruction for STEM Education Reform, I wanted to create a poster like in my previous post of graphical methods and linearizing graphs but this time about the basic classes of mathematical models that Hestenes lists.  I’m not sure that I like all the equation gobbledegook, but I think students need something to which to aspire, so I just made it less prominent.  I’d also like a better presentation of some of the equations.

mathematical-models-B-beamer-poster-18x24
mathematical-models-B-beamer-poster-18×24

Update: You can now find source code for this and other posters in my GitHub repository.

\documentclass[final]{beamer} % beamer 3.10: do NOT use option hyperref={pdfpagelabels=false} !
%\documentclass[final,hyperref={pdfpagelabels=false}]{beamer} % beamer 3.07: get rid of beamer warnings
\mode<presentation> {  %% check http://www-i6.informatik.rwth-aachen.de/~dreuw/latexbeamerposter.php for examples
\usetheme{default}    %% you should define your own theme e.g. for big headlines using your own logos
\beamertemplatenavigationsymbolsempty
\definecolor{royalblue}{rgb}{0,0.13725490196078433,0.4}
\definecolor{royalblueweb}{rgb}{0.25490196078431371,0.41176470588235292,0.88235294117647056}
\definecolor{burntorange}{rgb}{0.8,0.3333333333333333,0}
\setbeamercolor{frametitle}{fg=blue!80!black}
\setbeamertemplate{frametitle} {
\begin{center}
\vspace{-1.2cm}\textbf{\insertframetitle} \par
\normalsize\textbf{\insertframesubtitle}
\end{center}
}
}
\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage[latin1]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath,amsthm, amssymb, latexsym}
%\usepackage{times}\usefonttheme{professionalfonts}  % times is obsolete
\usefonttheme[onlymath]{serif}
\boldmath
%\usepackage[orientation=portrait,size=a0,scale=1.4,debug]{beamerposter}                       % e.g. for DIN-A0 poster
%\usepackage[orientation=portrait,size=a1,scale=1.4,grid,debug]{beamerposter}                  % e.g. for DIN-A1 poster, with optional grid and debug output
\usepackage[size=custom,width=45.72,height=60.96,scale=1.8,debug]{beamerposter}                     % e.g. for custom size poster (18in x 24in w/ printable 17in x 23in)
%\usepackage[orientation=portrait,size=a0,scale=1.0,printer=rwth-glossy-uv.df]{beamerposter}   % e.g. for DIN-A0 poster with rwth-glossy-uv printer check
% ...
%
\geometry{margin=.5in}
\usepackage{array}
\usepackage{booktabs}
\newcolumntype{P}[1]{>{\raggedright\large}p{#1}}
\def\imagetop#1{\vtop{\vspace{-1.5cm}\null\hbox{#1}\vspace{-1.5cm}}}
\usepackage{tikz}

\newcommand{\xx}{\textcolor{variable}{x}}
\newcommand{\yy}{\textcolor{variable}{y}}
\newcommand{\versus}{vs\ }
\newcommand{\plotscale}{2.0}
\newcommand{\plotline}{6pt}
\newcommand{\formatmm}[1]{\textcolor{royalblue}{\textbf{#1}}}
\colorlet{plot}{burntorange}
\colorlet{variable}{blue!80!black}

% From Hestenes' list of 4 basic mathematical models
\title[Mathematical Models]{Basic Classes of Mathematical Models}
\author[Vancil]{Brian Vancil}
\institute[Sumner]{Sumner Academy of Arts & Sciences}
\date{2012-04-07}

\begin{document}
\begin{frame}{Basic Classes of Mathematical Models}
\framesubtitle{with sample equations}
\defaultaddspace=.25em
\vspace{-2cm}
\begin{center}
\begin{tabular}{P{.45\linewidth}P{.29\linewidth}@{\quad}>{\arraybackslash}P{.19\linewidth}} \toprule[.1em]
\normalsize Mathematical model & \normalsize Kind of change & \normalsize Graph shape  \\ \midrule[.1em] \addlinespace

\formatmm{Linear model}
\par \normalsize $\yy=A\xx+B$
\par $\dfrac{d\yy}{d\xx}=A$ &
Rate of change is constant. &
\imagetop{\begin{tikzpicture}[scale=\plotscale,domain=0:4,line width=\plotline,smooth]
\draw[color=plot] plot (\x,.6*\x+1);
\draw[<->] (0,4) -- (0,0) -- (4,0);
\end{tikzpicture}}
\\ \addlinespace \midrule \addlinespace

\formatmm{Quadratic model}
\par \normalsize $\yy=A\xx^{2}+B\xx+C$
\par $\dfrac{d^{2}\yy}{d\xx^{2}}=A$ &
Rate of change of rate of change is constant. &
\imagetop{\begin{tikzpicture}[scale=\plotscale,domain=0:4,line width=\plotline,smooth,samples=40]
\draw[color=plot] plot (\x,{4-0.7*(\x-2)*(\x-2)});
\draw[<->] (0,4) -- (0,0) -- (4,0);
\end{tikzpicture}}
\\ \addlinespace \midrule \addlinespace

\formatmm{Exponential model}
\par \normalsize $\yy=Ab^{\xx}$ or $\yy=Ae^{\frac{\xx}{\xi}}$
\par $\dfrac{d\yy}{d\xx}=\ln b\cdot\yy$ or $\dfrac{d\yy}{d\xx}=\frac{\yy}{\xi}$ &
Rate of change is proportional to amount. &
\imagetop{\begin{tikzpicture}[scale=\plotscale,domain=0:4,line width=\plotline,smooth,samples=40]
\draw[color=plot] plot (\x,{pow(pow(4,.25),\x)});
\draw[<->] (0,4) -- (0,0) -- (4,0);
\end{tikzpicture}}
\\ \addlinespace \midrule \addlinespace

\formatmm{Harmonic model}
\par \normalsize $\yy=A\cos\left(k\xx+\phi\right)$ or $\yy=A\sin\left(k\xx+\phi'\right)$ or $\yy=\mathfrak{Re}\left\{Ae^{i(k\xx+\phi)}\right\}$
\par $\dfrac{d^{2}\yy}{d\xx^{2}}=-k^{2}\yy$ &
Rate of change of rate of change is proportional to amount. &
\imagetop{\begin{tikzpicture}[scale=\plotscale,domain=0:4,line width=\plotline,smooth,samples=40]
\draw[color=plot] plot (\x,{2*cos((\x*6.28-1)r)});
\draw[->] (0,-2) -- (0,2);
\draw[->] (0,0) -- (4,0);
\end{tikzpicture}}
\\ \addlinespace  \midrule \addlinespace

\formatmm{Sudden change model}
\par \normalsize $\yy=A\ \theta(\xx-x_{0})+B$
\par $\dfrac{d\yy}{d\xx}=A\ \delta(\xx-x_{0})$ &
Change is finite and instantaneous. &
\imagetop{\begin{tikzpicture}[scale=\plotscale,domain=0:4,line width=\plotline,smooth,samples=40]
\draw[color=plot, domain=0:2] plot (\x,1);
\draw[color=plot, domain=2:4] plot (\x,3);
\draw[<->] (0,4) -- (0,0) -- (4,0);
\end{tikzpicture}}
\\ \addlinespace

\bottomrule[.1em]
\end{tabular}
\end{center}
\end{frame}
\end{document}